The Rock of Gibraltar

Surrounded by Spanish territory, Gibraltar is an independent British colony.
Only around two square miles in size, it is growing thanks to a reclaiming project to increase the land size.

...See videos of Gibraltar's tailless monkeys on top of the Rock...

Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image
Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image
Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image
Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image
Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image Gallery Image
Powered by Fire Gallery

Gibraltar is one of the busiest ports in the world, serving both military and commercial interests.

Gibraltar derives its name from one of its many battles - more accurately, from one of the battle's heroes. In the 8th century, the Moorish general, Tariq ibn Ziyad took the rock and set up camp there. He named the limestone boulder by combining the Arabic word gebal (rock) and his name: gebal Tariq.

There were four of these 100 ton guns built, but none of them ever saw use.

The cable car will take you all the way to the top. On windy days it's closed, but we were lucky. In spite of 85 mile an hour winds coming into Gibraltar, it was calm by the time we got to the city.

These tailless monkeys live at the top of the Rock. They are known as the Barbary Apes. Nobody's sure just how they got to Gibraltar, but the rumor is when they leave, so will the British.

British fighting forces dug out a series of now excavated caves at the summit during the end of the 1700's.

There are over 30 miles of tunnels, which is roughly the number of miles of roads in Gibraltar. The tunnels and caves were used during the Napoleonic wars, up through WWII.